THE THINGS NOBODY TELLS A MOM-TO-BE (PART 2 – POSTPARTUM DEPRESSION )

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As a new mom, did you ever feel like you wanted to hide under your covers because opening your eyes and facing the world was too exhausting? Did you feel so overwhelmed with the changes around you and in your life that you couldn’t stop those tears rolling down at the drop of a hat? You worried so much that you were unable to sleep or you were so exhausted that you felt you needed to sleep all the time? Did you have anxiety attacks all the time? Did things that once made you smile and happy no longer interest you?

Well, let me tell you, these feelings are more common than you think! Postpartum depression is real. It can hit you soon after giving birth to anytime in the first year post delivery. We recently celebrated World Mental Health Day and I thought this is a good time to share with all of you, my second in the list of things that nobody tells a mom-to-be. Depression in new moms is real. Scary this sounds, doesn’t it? I mean how can a mum be unhappy? She just had a beautiful baby, her life is great. But the number of changes going on inside her are as real as the baby in her arms.

Even though, depression cannot be diagnosed at home and needs medical intervention for detection and sometimes even medication, being aware that you could be dealing with it is a big step in your favour. Timely help will go a long way in your parenting journey and help you bond easier with your new baby.

Things that helped me were talking out loud about my feelings instead of bottling them up with the fear of being judged. Accepting help when I needed it instead of trying to handle everything by myself. I keep repeating this often because it is tough to accept that we need help! In fact, it is often close friends and family who notice these changes in us and are the best ones to guide us in accepting that we need help. Tough as it sounds, we need to be around for each other. Be open to reach out for help. Accept that it is ok to have negative feelings, as long as they don’t take over our capacity to function in a normal manner.

If you need to talk about this, I am around and happy to help in any way I can. All you need to do is, ask!